Calling for Nominations for Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Awards

Award applications for the 12th annual National Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) Awards now are being accepted. The 2019 National BQA Awards recognize five winners in the areas of beef, dairy, marketing and education:

  • The BQA Cow Calf and BQA Feedyard awards recognize producers who best demonstrate the implementation of BQA principles as part of the day-to-day activities on their respective operations.
  • The BQA / FARM (Farmers Assuring Responsible Management) award honors those dairy operations that demonstrate the best in animal care and handling while implementing the BQA and FARM programs at the highest levels.
  • The BQA Marketer Award acknowledges livestock markets, cattle buyers and supply-chain programs that promote BQA to their customers and offer them opportunities to get certified.
  • The BQA Educator Award celebrates individuals or companies that provide high quality and innovative training to individuals that care and handle cattle throughout the industry chain.

The National BQA Awards are selected by a committee of BQA certified representatives from universities, state beef councils, sponsors and affiliated groups. Nominations are submitted by organizations, groups or individuals on behalf of a U.S. beef producer, dairy beef producer, marketer or educator. Individuals and families may not nominate themselves, though the nominees are expected to be involved in the preparation of the application. Past nominees are encouraged to submit their application under the new nomination structure. Previous winners may not reapply.

The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association manages the BQA program as a contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program. Funding for the BQA Awards is made possible by the generosity of Cargill, which has supported the program since its inception, and Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, which sponsors the BQA Educator Award.

Find the application and nomination requirements here. Applications are due by June 1, 2018.

For more information about BQA visit BQA.org.

Quality Beef from Quality Cattle Care | 10 Things To Know

Ed & David Fryer BQA at Castle Mountain RanchQuality beef comes from cattle who are well cared for and raised with a strong code of ethics and values. Ranchers providing that care are passionate and dedicated in what they do. Despite some reports from activists groups who use online forums to promote mistreatment of animals and solicit fund raising for their programs, cattle ranchers across the country devote significant time and resources to ensuring their livestock are cared for properly.

Beginning in the 1970s, cattle producers began to develop programs to evaluate, measure and ensure quality care for livestock and a safe beef supply. Today, that program has developed into the Beef Quality Assurance Program with guiding principles to establish standards for animal care.

  • WE BELIEVE production practices affect consumer acceptance of beef.
  • WE BELIEVE the BQA Program has and must continue to empower beef producers to improve the safety and wholesomeness of beef.
  • WE BELIEVE these fundamental principles are the fabricoftheBQA Program.
    1. Empowering people…because producers can make a difference.
    2. Taking responsibility…because it’s our job, not someone else’s.
    3. Working together…because product safety and wholesomeness is everyone’s business.
Beef Quality Assurance ProgramsCattle ranchers take pride in their responsibility to raising cattle, taking care of their land, and being good stewards of their resources. To suggest ranchers lack the proper values in raising safe, quality food, would be misleading. Thousands of cattle ranchers across the country participate in the Beef Quality Assurance programs which outline a Code of Cattle Care to ensure proper care and handling of livestock:
  1. Provide necessary food, water and care to protect the health and well-being of animals.
  2. Provide disease prevention practices to protect herd health, including access to veterinary care.
  3. Provide facilities that allow safe, humane, and efficient movement and/or restraint of cattle.
  4. Use appropriate methods to humanely euthanize terminally sick or injured livestock and dispose of them properly.
  5. Provide personnel with training/experience to properly handle and care for cattle.
  6. Make timely observations of cattle to ensure basic needs are being met.
  7. Minimize stress when transporting cattle.
  8. Keep updated on advancements and changes in the industry to make decisions based upon sound production practices and consideration for animal well-being.
  9. Persons who willfully mistreat animals will not be tolerated.

Want to hear from some of these ranchers? Take time to view interviews with Montana ranchers as they discuss their dedication to the livestock and the lifestyle by visiting our YouTube channel.

The Beef Quality Assurance Program outlines the minimum expectations of ranchers for cattle care and handling. To learn more about the program, visit BQA.org or contact your state’s coordinator. Learn more about Montana’s BQA program by visiting their Facebook page or by contacting Bill Pelton at (406) 671-5100 or by email at bill@billpelton.com.

What questions do you have about Beef Quality Assurance? Leave a comment below or email ryan@mtbeef.org. This is part of a month-long series of 10 Things to Know about Cattle. To read other posts in the series, click the image below.

Click this image to view all posts in the 30-day blogging series, 10 Things to Know About Cattle

Click this image to view all posts in the 30-day blogging series, 10 Things to Know About Cattle

Checkoff and Beef Quality Assurance | Beef Briefs

Did you know …

join BQA team… your Beef Checkoff Program helps build consumer confidence?

Today’s consumers want to know more about how their food was raised, and the checkoff-funded Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program can be a positive influence in sharing with consumers how cattlemen and women provide the best care possible for their cattle. BQA is based on sound management practices developed from years of practical experience and research and helps beef producers raise safe, high-quality beef.

The BQA program focuses on education and training and can help enhance carcass values by reducing animal illnesses and treatment. BQA practices, such as safe handling techniques, help reduce stress and bruising, which aids in producing quality beef and can directly impact producers’ bottom lines.

BQA training encompasses animal health, handling, record keeping, nutrition and general animal care that improve beef products and help maintain consumer confidence in the sound production practices endorsed by the cattle industry.

Learn more at www.MyBeefCheckoff.com
Beef Briefs is your monthly snapshot of beef checkoff news affecting the beef and dairy industries.
Provided by the great folks at the Montana Beef Council.

Beef Checkoff and Consumer Confidence | Beef Briefs

Beef Briefs Consumer Confidence Beef Quality AssuranceDid you know …

… your Beef Checkoff Program helps build consumer confidence?

Today’s consumers want to know more about how their food was raised, and the checkoff-funded Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program can be a positive influence in sharing with consumers how cattlemen and women provide the best care possible for their cattle. BQA is based on sound management practices developed from years of practical experience and research and helps beef producers raise safe, high-quality beef.

The BQA program focuses on education and training and can help enhance carcass values by reducing animal illnesses and treatment. BQA practices, such as safe handling techniques, help reduce stress and bruising, which aids in producing quality beef and can directly impact producers’ bottom lines.

BQA training encompasses animal health, handling, record keeping, nutrition and general animal care that improve beef products and help maintain consumer confidence in the sound production practices endorsed by the cattle industry.

Learn more at www.MyBeefCheckoff.com
Beef Briefs is your monthly snapshot of beef checkoff news affecting the beef and dairy industries.
Provided by the great folks at the Montana Beef Council.

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Beef Quality Assurance Programs

Beef Quality Assurance Program and Animal Welfare

Beef Quality Assurance ProgramsWhat is the Beef Quality Assurance program and what does it have to do with Animal Welfare standards for ranchers and cattle producers in the United States?

Beef Quality Assurance is a national program that provides guidelines for beef cattle production. The program raises consumer confidence through offering proper management techniques and a commitment to quality within every segment of the beef industry. Producers have embraced BQA because it is the right thing to do; but they have also gained through increased profitability. As an educating program, BQA helps producers identify management processes that can be improved.

Below is a bit of background information on the programs. For more on National BQA programs, visit BQA.org. For contact information in Montana, click here. For online BQA certification, click here.

History of the Beef Quality Assurance Program

The Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program was established in 1987 by The Beef Checkoff to provide cattle producers with the tools and training necessary to assure animal health and well-being as well as provide a safe, quality product. BQA is a pre-harvest supply chain management program that applies the latest science and technology to ensure beef quality and safety. It unites animal scientists, veterinarians, feed suppliers, animal health companies, meatpackers, retailers and state and federal regulators with producers to achieve this common goal.

BQA Certification Process

BQA encourages anyone who works regularly with cattle – on the farm, ranch or feedlot – to become BQA certified by one of nearly 100 state coordinators through hands-on, classroom-style and online training. BQA influences the management practices of more than 90 percent of U.S. cattle.

BQA Guidelines Relating to Animal Care and Husbandry

The BQA principals on cattle care and treatment are captured within the foundational document, the “Cattle Industry’s Guidelines for the Care and Handling of Cattle.” The “Cattle Industry’s Guidelines for the Care and Handling of Cattle” is based on the “Producer Code for Cattle Care.” The Code, first developed in 1996, is a comprehensive set of “must-dos” for proper cattle care that includes the following:

  • Provide adequate food, water and care to protect cattle health and well-being.
  • Provide disease prevention practices to protect herd health.
  • Provide facilities that allow safe and humane movement and/or restraint of livestock.
  • Use appropriate methods to euthanize sick or injured livestock.
  • Provide personnel with training to properly handle and care for cattle.
  • Minimize stress when transporting cattle.

The Code is clear on another important point: persons who willfully mistreat animals will not be tolerated.

In 2003, the beef industry expanded the Code into a best practices guide. Developed through the interaction of animal health and well-being experts and cattle producer leaders, the “Cattle Industry’s Guidelines for the Care and Handling of Cattle” sets forth recommendations for every aspect of cattle production and provides producers a self-evaluation checklist to help improve their production practices. The Guidelines include best-management practices for feeding and nutrition, disease prevention practices and health care, identification, shelter and housing, cattle handling, transportation, non-ambulatory cattle, euthanasia and heat stress.

BQA Acknowledges Leaders for Applying Best Practices

For the first time in 2008, a National BQA Award was established to reward leaders in the industry who exemplify BQA principles and share their outstanding individual practices with the broader industry. Two producers were awarded the National BQA Award in 2008.

New BQA Programs Address Livestock Auction Markets and Transportation

In 2008, every auction market in the country received the checkoff-funded BQA DVD “Focal Point: An Auction Market Beef Quality Assurance Guide,” which demonstrates best practices for facility design and handling techniques. Cattle handling experts also conducted hands-on staff training sessions at livestock markets.

BQA’s Master Cattle Transporter Training program, launched in 2008, recognizes that cattle transporters play a critical role in the health and welfare of cattle by delivering cattle safely to their destination. The program emphasizes low-stress handling, frequent cattle checks when on the road and special care when transporting cattle during hot or cold weather conditions. Additionally, the program specifies that moving aids should replace electric prods and sick or weak cattle shouldn’t be accepted for transport, including debilitated thin animals, “downers” and animals that show symptoms of sickness. The National Trucking Association encourages its members to comply with these guidelines.

For more information about the BQA program, please visit www.BQA.org. National BQA programs are funded in part by The Beef Checkoff.

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Ed & David Fryer BQA at Castle Mountain Ranch

MSGA’s Manager of Communications Ariel Overstreet, multimedia intern Lauren Chase, and Director of Montana Beef Quality Assurance Clint Peck visited Castle Mountain Ranch in White Sulphur Springs. Ed and David Fryer, a father-son team, volunteer to teach ranchers and the public how to properly handle cattle while moving them. This program is called Beef Quality Assurance and training sessions are held throughout the year in various locations around the state. To see more photos, check out MSGA’s Facebook page: click here.